Former MLB player's son seriously injured after being hit in face with baseball

Former MLB player's son seriously injured after being hit in face with baseball

News

Former MLB player's son seriously injured after being hit in face with baseball

Jason Lockhart, the 15-year-old son of former Atlanta Braves second baseman Keith Lockhart, is receiving serious medical attention to treat profuse bleeding after he was hit in the face with a baseball, according to the Associated Press and other media reports.

The younger Lockhart was hit while crossing home plate in a June 17 game at a South Carolina tournament. But on Friday he was placed on life support and put in a paralytic state at Scottish Rite Hospital in Atlanta to help stop any movement that would encourage or cause more bleeding, according to a Facebook post by his sister, Sydney.

Lockhart was originally given stitches after the injury. But after following up two days later to remove packing from his nose, he began to bleed uncontrollably before a CT scan showed the nose fracture also included a tear inside his nose. Subsequent surgeries have taken place to help find the cause of the bleeding, and on Sunday Keith Lockhart tweeted that the doctors located three areas of bleeding and stopped the flow of blood.

Sydney Lockhart wrote Sunday night on Facebook that the family was “tired but hopeful.”

“The doctors decided to take Jason into surgery to do an endovascular embolization today,” she wrote. “They went into his arteries and blood vessels and found the two most practical areas that could be feeding the areas where Jason has been bleeding. They went into both arteries on each side of his nose and cut off the blood supply. They are hopeful that this is the source of the bleeding. The surgery was a couple of hours long and Jason is now resting still on the ventilator to keep his vitals monitored and keep him comfortable. They will watch him for 24 hours and then he will go into surgery tomorrow to have his nose repacked and this will give them an opportunity to look back behind the packing to make sure there are no other areas bleeding.”

For more, visit USA TODAY Sports

Latest

More USA TODAY High School Sports
Home