Georgia athletic body rules in favor of Michigan signee Kurt Taylor after eligibility questioned

Georgia athletic body rules in favor of Michigan signee Kurt Taylor after eligibility questioned

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Georgia athletic body rules in favor of Michigan signee Kurt Taylor after eligibility questioned

The state athletic body in Georgia has closed the case regarding the eligibility of a key member of one of last year’s state championship teams.

According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Georgia High School Athletic Association (GHSA) found no evidence that Grayson (Loganville, Ga.) transfer student and football standout Kurt Taylor broke any rules with his move from Newton (Covington, Ga.) in the offseason.

GHSA assistant executive director Jay Russell confirmed the ruling to the Journal-Constitution Tuesday.

Taylor, a three-star recruit and Michigan signee who was also the leading rusher on Grayson’s Class AAAAAAA championship team, transferred to Grayson and then back to Newton following the football season. He was one of five Grayson senior transfers who went on to sign with Power Five conference college football programs. Taylor had previously starred at tailback for three years at Newton.

RELATED: Georgia athletic body to investigate eligibility of Michigan commit Kurt Taylor

Per the Journal-Constitution, to be eligible immediately for sports at a new school, a transfer student generally must move into his new district and leave his previous residence. A March report by Fox 5 Atlanta, however, revealed that Taylor was living again in his original Covington residence, which brought up questions about whether he truly left the home during his time at Grayson, specifically during the football season.

‘’We didn’t have anything to prove otherwise,’’ Russell told the Journal-Constitution. “We felt it was a bona fide move. The school [Grayson] produced evidence that it was.’’

Russell added that the GHSA talked about whether Taylor’s failure to reach the one-year threshold at the school may make him ineligible retroactively at Grayson. That would have resulted in the team forfeiting its 14 wins and state title in 2016. Per advice from its attorney, though, the GHSA declined due to lack of precedence and ambiguity in the way the bylaw was written.

So the state title stays with Grayson, as do all of those wins Taylor helped the team amass – even if he is finishing his senior year at another school.

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