Nova Scotia teachers' strike forces major shifts in huge HS hockey tournament

An ongoing Nova Scotia Teachers Union strike has impacted a major high school hockey tournament in neighboring New Brunswick (Photo: CTV video screen shot)

Nova Scotia teachers' strike forces major shifts in huge HS hockey tournament

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Nova Scotia teachers' strike forces major shifts in huge HS hockey tournament

An ongoing Nova Scotia Teachers Union strike has impacted a major high school hockey tournament in neighboring New Brunswick (Photo: CTV video screen shot)

An ongoing Nova Scotia Teachers Union strike has impacted a major high school hockey tournament in neighboring New Brunswick (Photo: CTV video screen shot)

A massive teachers’ strike across Nova Scotia has wreaked havoc on a traditional high school hockey tournament that pits teams from the Atlantic provinces. Now, the missed games are sparking an enormous blame game thanks to potential budget shortfalls caused by a lack of room occupancy and tourist dollars in the city that hosts the event.

As reported by Canadian national broadcaster CTV, the annual High School Classic hockey tournament, hosted each year in Moncton, New Brunswick, was forced to scale back its schedule when 11 teams based in Nova Scotia were forced to withdraw because school sports in the province have been suspended while a massive teachers strike rolls on. The union-backed walk-out has led to a near-sure loss of the entire high school hockey season in Nova Scotia, with a replacement Midget league aiming to take its place on an interim basis.

Meanwhile, the loss of the registration fees from the entire group of Nova Scotia squads will set back the organizers of the tournament a minimum of $13,000, with a subsequent multiplier effect for the impact coming from the hotel and restaurant revenues that would necessary be driven by an influx of 11 teams worth of players and their families.

As for the players themselves, the one thing all seem to agree on is that the true victims in this situation are the Nova Scotia players who find themselves on the outside of one of the biggest tournaments in the country.

“I feel bad for them,” Shane Doio, coach of the Louis-J-Robichaud Patriotes, told CTV. “Some of them it may be their last year in high school. It’s very difficult and I’m hoping it gets resolved as quickly as possible.”

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