adidas Gauntlet: True to himself, David McCormack is content playing full time in the paint

adidas Gauntlet: True to himself, David McCormack is content playing full time in the paint

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adidas Gauntlet: True to himself, David McCormack is content playing full time in the paint

CARTERSVILLE, Ga. – David McCormack isn’t undergoing an identity crisis; he’s well aware of who he is, and, perhaps more importantly, who he’s not.

McCormack is a brute, 6-foot-10 bruiser of a big man who overpowers the opposition, works hard on the boards and rarely, if ever, leaves the paint.

“I’m not a guard or a stretch-four or anything like that; I’m me,” said McCormack, who scored eight points and grabbed 11 rebounds in Team Loaded-VA’s 67-63 win over the Atlanta Celtics (Ga.) Saturday at the adidas Gauntlet. “Big guys feel like they have to evolve because the game has a lot of versatile bigs that can play like guards, but I feel like you’re more successful when you’re true to yourself.”

McCormack’s 29 offers certainly strengthen that point, everyone from Duke to Kansas to South Carolina to Baylor all sit courtside at his games at the Gauntlet applying the recruiting full-court press.

Lends great credence to the old adage that people are more drawn to authenticity.

That said, McCormack can recall a time when he thought he had to change his game to attract attention from top schools.

Enter his mother Janine McCormack.

“My mom would always tell me to go bully people in the paint,” said McCormack, who averaged 10.6 points and 8.6 rebounds for Oak Hill Academy (Mouth of Wilson, Va.) last season. “She would notice things and constantly tell me not to get out of who I am. That gave me all the confidence in the world.”

Team Loaded-VA coach Michael Blackwell said it’s refreshing to have a true big man that wants to work full-time in the paint.

“Today’s big is more on the perimeter shooting threes, but David embraces the paint,” Blackwell said. “He’s got a great motor and he plays with passion. The thing that separates him big time is that he rebounds out of his area and that’s a testament to how hard he works. He’s a throwback.”

Still, don’t get him wrong, McCormack sees value in being able to knockdown the 15-footer and ease the defensive pressure on the guards by being capable of handling the ball until they’re able to break free, just don’t expect that to his norm.

“I want to work on parts of my game because I think it will make me even harder to stop,” McCormack said. “But I know where my bread and butter is. I’m not confused about that at all. You’ve just gotta be yourself.”

Besides, everyone else is taken.

Follow Jason Jordan on Twitter: @JayJayUSATODAY.

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