Study: 50 percent of high school pitchers report pain in throwing arm

In a new study at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, researchers developed a high-tech mound that measures the amount of force being driven by the legs, trunk and arms when a pitcher throws a baseball. Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Study: 50 percent of high school pitchers report pain in throwing arm

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Study: 50 percent of high school pitchers report pain in throwing arm

According to a recent study out of Ohio State University, a bit more than half of high school pitchers experience pain in their throwing arm during a season.

To better understand the cause of these injuries, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a study to determine when and why overuse injuries are occurring.

“We found that the number of injuries peaked early—only about four weeks in—and then slowly declined until the end of the season,” James Onate, associate professor of health and rehabilitation sciences at the Jameson Crane Sports Medicine Institute, said in a University release. “We see a lot of kids who didn’t prepare in the off-season and, when their workload goes through the roof, they’re not prepared for the demand of throwing.”

For the study, 97 high school pitchers were asked to submit a weekly questionnaire via text message.

“Most of the pain reported was mild or moderate and players were actually continuing to play through it,” Mike McNally, research associate in Ohio State University’s School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, said in the release. “Part of the reason we think we’re seeing a decline is because players start to get used to playing through the pain as the season goes on. So they likely still have that pain, it just doesn’t affect them like it used to.”

Per the release, researchers are also investigating how much biomechanics play into overuse injuries. The team developed a high-tech pitching mound that measures the amount of force being driven by the legs, trunk and arms when throwing. Additionally, there is a preseason program to help pitchers properly prepare their bodies to avoid injuries.

3-D models chart the movement of baseball pitchers when they throw. A new study at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center used these models to analyze how much force is placed on a pitcher’s arm and how that contributes to overuse injuries. Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

3-D models chart the movement of baseball pitchers when they throw. A new study at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center used these models to analyze how much force is placed on a pitcher’s arm and how that contributes to overuse injuries. (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

“We’re starting to pinpoint what’s going to be the personalized approach to an individual to be able to throw, and then tweak it from there,” Onate said. “The whole goal is to keep the kids safe to be able to do what they want to do.”

RELATED: It’s time for high school baseball to shift to summer. No kidding.

Per the release, Ohio State researchers are advocating that the high school baseball season be extended so that games postponed due to inclement weather can be spread out over several weeks. Playing too many games in close succession may lead to more injuries.

James Onate and Mike McNally look at a 3-D model of a baseball pitcher during his throwing motion. They led a new study at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center that studied overuse injuries in high school pitchers. Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

James Onate and Mike McNally look at a 3-D model of a baseball pitcher during his throwing motion. They led a new study at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center that studied overuse injuries in high school pitchers. (Photo: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center)

“Spreading out games is important in that it allows players to get some recovery time. Rainouts and postponements force kids to go from playing a few games a week to five or six games per week,” McNally said. “When that happens, you have a high school kid that’s essentially playing a major league schedule, which can accumulate and cause more pain and injuries.”

Aside from Onate and McNally, the research team included Ajit Chaudhari from Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center, as well as Jingzhen Yang and Kevin Klingele from Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

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