There's at least 1 way Ankeny's high schools will stay unified

There's at least 1 way Ankeny's high schools will stay unified

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There's at least 1 way Ankeny's high schools will stay unified

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One booster club for two major high school athletic programs? That’s the plan in Ankeny, which is splitting into two schools this fall.
The Ankeny Sports Booster Club has decided it will support both Ankeny High School and Ankeny Centennial.
“We truly believe what we are doing will benefit the community for years to come,” said Eric Long, president of the Ankeny Sports Booster Club.
As part of the club’s arrangement designed to maintain unity in Ankeny, fans can attend home sporting events at both schools for one price during the 2013-14 school year. The booster club is offering its annual memberships at last year’s rates until the end of June.
Memberships are $100 for an individual and $250 for a family. The cost for both types of memberships will increase by $50 on July 1. The passes can be used immediately for this season’s Ankeny baseball and softball games.
“We may have to make adjustments as we go on, but it’s a great deal for the upcoming year,” Long said. “If we do well with it and we sell a lot of the passes and it’s something that everyone is happy about, I could see it going on in some shape or form, especially in football.
“What an opportunity to go every Friday night and see a good football game.”
How will one booster club support two schools?
Long said the club will have two executive teams — one for Ankeny, one for Centennial. The goal is that the teams will work together in an effort to address the needs of both schools. That includes joint fundraising ventures.
“That way the businesses that the booster club relies on for support won’t be in a position of putting the two schools against each other,” Long said. “That’s definitely not what we wanted to do.”
Ankeny Sports Booster Club board member Dean Smith understood that having one club serving the interests of two schools could have its challenges, noting the fierce rivalry that developed in Iowa City over four decades ago when a second school, West High, was built.
“A few people have raised their eyebrows, but I’d say for the most part that the majority of the people think it’s a very good concept — at least short term — to ease into the transition of being separate,” Smith said. “It’s tough to predict if it will be a long-term solution, because you look at (the rivalry between) Iowa City High and Iowa City West now.
“We just thought for the sake of community unity and to support the kids and to have as little fan division as possible initially that we should try to keep the sports boosters together.”
Smith’s son, Dallas, will be a sophomore on the Centennial boys’ soccer team next spring.
“My son just completed his freshman year, and now next year — boom! — he’ll be split,” Smith said. “But at least for the next three years, we can go watch him play, and we can also watch all of the kids that he’s played with for the last several years. We just want to try to build a strong fan base that will support both schools.”

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There's at least 1 way Ankeny's high schools will stay unified
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