Alabama-bound lineman aims to exceed NFL brother’s mark

Alabama-bound lineman aims to exceed NFL brother’s mark

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Alabama-bound lineman aims to exceed NFL brother’s mark

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Tennessee Titans guard Chance Warmack (L) and younger brother Dallas, have competed against each other since childhood. Dallas, who is six years younger, will follow his brother’s path to Alabama in January. | Photo courtesy of the Warmack Family

Tennessee Titans guard Chance Warmack (L) and brother Dallas, a senior at Mays High (Atlanta, Ga.), have competed against each other since childhood. Dallas, who is six years younger, will follow his brother’s path to Alabama in January. | Photo courtesy of the Warmack Family

When Tennessee Titans guard Chance Warmack is home in Georgia, his mother Courtney knows she’ll be the designated timekeeper. Chance and his younger brother Dallas, a senior offensive lineman at Mays High (Atlanta, Ga.), head to the school’s football field for a heated battle of sprints.

The brothers have competed against each other since childhood. Though Dallas is six years younger, he doesn’t think of himself as the baby brother to his superstar brother.

“He’s his own person,” said Chance, 23, who was selected No. 10 overall by the Titans in the 2013 NFL draft. “He’s making it apparent that people won’t look at him in my shadow. His personal goal is to be better than me.”

Dallas Warmack has an edge. He’s received more college offers than his brother did in high school. And unlike his brother, Warmack was named to the prestigious U.S. Army All-American Bowl, which brings together the nation’s top high school football players.

“It’s a big honor,” Warmack said. “I’m going to play the game while thinking about Chance.”

When Warmack steps into San Antonio’s Alamodome in January, he’ll fulfill a dream his brother wanted for himself.

“His personal goal is to be better than me.” – Chance Warmack on his brother Dallas

“To see my little brother doing things that I couldn’t do is amazing,” Chance said. “He deserves everything he has. He’s worked really hard for what he’s earned.”

Warmack hopes that will include a starting lineman spot at Alabama, where he’ll enroll after he graduates early from Mays in December.

Fans in Tuscaloosa are already familiar with his last name — and not just because he’s an incoming four-star rated threat. His brother was an All-American and helped lead the Tide to the 2012 BCS National Championship.

And while Warmack is happy that his brother made a mark at Alabama, “There will be a difference.”

For starters, he intends to label the back of his football jersey as “DWarmack.” He also aims to win the Outland Trophy, which honors the best college defensive lineman — an award his brother did not receive.

But he might adopt “Warmacking.” He laughs in reference to his brother’s habit of rolling up his jersey, slightly exposing his belly, as a way to stay cool. The custom became a trend among fans.

“I’m going to play the game while thinking about Chance.” – Dallas Warmack on playing in the U.S. Army All-American Bowl

“Being the younger brother of Chance really makes him work harder,” his mother said. “Chance set the bar. He wants to exceed the expectations of others.”

After all, without his older brother’s influence, Warmack might not have pursued the sport. He was introduced to football at age four, but quit after an older, bigger player knocked him out.

“It was too aggressive for me. I was a little skinnier than I am now,” laughed Warmack, who is 6-2, 306.

He took up soccer and basketball, but returned to football at 8, encouraged by his brother and studying the game alongside him. By the time Warmack was in eighth grade at St. Peter Claver (Decatur, Ga.), he was welcomed onto the football team at Our Lady of Mercy Catholic High School in Fayetteville, Ga. He rode a bus after school to attend practices.

Though Warmack said he was initially nervous to play with older and more developed players, the experience and learning schemes and plays prepared him for a starting spot on the varsity as a freshman at North Atlanta.

Warmack transferred to Mays that spring. Mays football coach Corey Jarvis said the three-year starter’s understated work ethic has shaped him into an explosive, powerful asset for the Raiders, someone looked up to by teammates.

“I could see Dallas being a coach,” Jarvis said. “He’s not vocal all the time. But when he speaks, his teammates know it means a lot because when he talks, he backs it up.”

And Warmack expects to continue to do so at Alabama.

“The sky’s the limit for him,” his brother said. “I’m happy to see him grow and get better as a player and as a young man.”

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