Snoop Dogg’s son out to make noise on the gridiron

Snoop Dogg’s son out to make noise on the gridiron

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Snoop Dogg’s son out to make noise on the gridiron

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Bishop Gorman (Las Vegas, Nev.) senior wide receiver Cordell Broadus, aka Lil Snoop, is ready to make an impact for the Gaels, No. 1 in the USA TODAY Super 25 High School Football preseason rankings. | Photo by Long Nguyen

Bishop Gorman (Las Vegas, Nev.) senior wide receiver Cordell Broadus, aka Lil Snoop, is ready to make an impact for the Gaels, No. 1 in the USA TODAY Super 25 High School Football preseason rankings. | Photo by Long Nguyen

Teammates call him “Channel 21”, but Bishop Gorman (Las Vegas, Nev.) High senior Cordell Broadus also responds to “Lil Snoop” — as in son of Calvin, aka Snoop Dogg.

But he quickly expressed there’s more to him than being a famous rapper’s son. And he’s been busy proving it on the gridiron for the past three seasons.

USC, UCLA, LSU, Nebraska, Oregon and Florida State have noticed. The 6-foot-2, 185-pound wide receiver has already received 15 scholarship offers.

After transferring from Diamond Bar (Calif.) High, where he caught 60 passes for 685 yards and had eight touchdowns last year, Broadus joins the Gaels for his senior season.

Broadus’ focus isn’t on narrowing his top five colleges, he told USA TODAY High School Sports’ Sarah Gearhart. Rather, his priority is to contribute as much as he can to help uphold Bishop Gorman’s status as the best football program in the nation.

The Gaels are No. 1 in the USA TODAY Super 25 High School Football preseason rankings. Tonight’s season opener against Brophy Prep (Phoeniz, Ariz.) could change that, but Broadus said he’s determined to not let it.

Live from Las Vegas, Lil Snoop chatted about suiting up for the Gaels, what he admires most about his father, and the one thing he considers more important than football.

Bishop Gorman is the third high school you’ve attended, along with Long Beach Poly and Diamond Bar in California. Tell us about adapting and what you’re most looking forward to at BG.
Broadus:
I just have the same mentality no matter what school I go to. I push myself and be as positive as I can. I’m really excited to be a part of Bishop Gorman. There are so many opportunities here — it’s a great school, especially academically. We have the best everything. I really want to help this team keep their number one ranking. I’m focused on trying to be a contributor.

What do you most respect about your father, and how has he influenced you?
Broadus:
We live two different lifestyles — I play football, and he’s in the music field. Football is something I’d rather do with my life. It’s pretty cool to have a parent sit back and let you make decisions, but he’s also there for me when I need him. He’s always taught me to be competitive no matter what. He’s been doing music for 22 years. It’s a competitive field, and he still hasn’t stopped.

 Despite his 15 scholarship offers, Broadus said he feels the need to work harder to prove that he’s “for real” and not hyped because of his famous father. | Photo by Long Nguyen


Despite his 15 scholarship offers, Broadus said he feels the need to work harder to prove that he’s “for real” and not hyped because of his famous father. | Photo by Long Nguyen

It’s no secret that Snoop Dogg is an avid football fan. Can you hear him cheering in the stands when you play?
Broadus:
Sometimes I’ll see him during halftime. I really don’t pay attention to the stands. I just worry about the game, what the score is and how I can contribute.

You’ve been fortunate to have trained with NFLers Trent Richardson and DeSean Jackson a couple summers ago. What was most valuable about that experience?
Broadus:
They taught me a lot that I tried to transfer onto the field. We worked on speed and ran routes. They told me to run full speed after every ball I catch so that when I’m in a game, it’s a mental — your muscles will remember and you can just run past defenders.

As much as you love the game, above all else you’ve expressed there’s something more important than playing.
Broadus:
My mother always told me that football is temporary. Education is the main thing. My auntie and my grandmother have been teaching me that since I was a little kid. And I’ve never forgotten.

 

 

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