Another top recruit opts out from signing National Letter of Intent

Another top recruit opts out from signing National Letter of Intent

Outside The Box

Another top recruit opts out from signing National Letter of Intent

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At first it was an aberration. Now it appears to be gaining steam toward becoming a legitimate trend.

As first reported by the Oregonian, Maranatha senior shooting guard Tyler Dorsey, one of the top recruits in the Class of 2015, has decided not to sign his letter of intent to the University of Oregon, where he fully expects to matriculate. That hasn’t changed, even though he is now insisting that he won’t sign a letter of intent.

The reason behind Dorsey’s decision is fairly straight forward. Singing a letter of intent forces a player to sit out a full academic year if he should decide to transfer. Given the general lack of stability for college basketball coaches today, that’s a penalty that Dorsey isn’t willing to absorb.

“It was a family decision,” Samia Dorsey, Tyler’s mother, told the Oregonian. “We just decided it’d be best, just in case a coach leaves, he has the opportunity to re-evaluate that decision, so he’s not stuck. He loves the school, but he built a relationship with Altman and Stubblefield, so if they would leave, you don’t know who’s coming in… it gives you an option.

“We haven’t talked to Oregon about (concerns). They seem comfortable.”

The trick of course is that Dorsey can still attend Oregon without signing a letter of intent. The only risk is that without signing a letter of intent, Oregon can always back out of its side of the scholarship offer and extend the grant-in-aid to another athlete, essentially eliminating the scholarship earmarked for Dorsey from under his nose.

That isn’t a huge concern for Dorsey, who is widely acknowledged to be one of the top five overall recruits in the Class of 2015. There are almost no players Oregon would rather take the scholarship than Dorsey himself.

Of course, that luxury isn’t available for all recruits, but for those who can receive it, there may be more to consider now than ever before.

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