California principal apologizes to rival school for offensive sign at basketball game

California principal apologizes to rival school for offensive sign at basketball game

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California principal apologizes to rival school for offensive sign at basketball game

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The principal of Foothills High School in California has apologized to crosstown rival Tustin High for an offensive sign help up in the student section during a basketball game between the two teams this week.

According to the Orange County Register and OCWeekly, the sign said #chunti, a derisive term for poor rural Mexicans. The Weekly compared the term to “hillbilly”  and said it was “close to white trash.”

“I am truly embarrassed and sorry that this happened at an otherwise positive event for the community,” Foothill High School Principal Nick Stephany wrote Friday in a note posted on Tustin High school’s website and social media accounts. “The actions by this student do not reflect the values or standards of Foothill High School. …

“I extend my deepest apologies to the Tustin High School community and pledge that this will never be tolerated.”

Both schools are part of the Tustin Unified School District.

The Friday apology followed the publishing of the sign in the OCWeekly.

Mark Eliot, a spokesman for the Tustin Unified School District, said two students have been identified as being responsible for the sign and that they were “remorseful.” He said they will be disciplined.

Foothills will no longer allow posters to be brought to games and there will be outreach between the two schools, including the student councils contacting each other.

Stephany said he wished the sign had been noticed earlier.

The rivalry continued after the game and Twitter and Stephany said continuing to talk about the game on social media could lead to school discipline.  “Students that tweet or post offensive comments or pictures will have school based disciplinary consequences accordingly.”

The reaction to the school’s decision to apologize also caused another social media flareup.

 

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