A list of 13 parents pleading guilty in college admissions scam, and their payments

Photo: Katherine Taylor, EPA-EFE

A list of 13 parents pleading guilty in college admissions scam, and their payments

High School Sports

A list of 13 parents pleading guilty in college admissions scam, and their payments

By

Actress Felicity Huffman is among 13 parents charged in the college admissions scandal who have agreed to plead guilty to using bribery and other forms of fraud to get their kids into elite colleges and universities, federal authorities announced Monday.

Actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, who also were among a total of nearly three dozen parents charged in the admissions scheme, were not on the list of those who have negotiated plea agreements with federal prosecutors in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Boston, which is overseeing the investigation.

Huffman released a statement of contrition to The Hollywood Reporter in which she said she felt “deep regret and shame” for the “pain” she caused to her daughter, family, friends, colleagues and the educational community.

She also said her daughter knew nothing about her actions and “in my misguided and profoundly wrong way, I have betrayed her.

“This transgression toward her and the public I will carry for the rest of my life,” she wrote.

There was no indication in the prosecutors’ announcement about the terms of the plea agreements, or whether any of the defendants will be expected to serve time in prison.

Under federal sentencing guidelines, the mail fraud charge provides for a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, plus three years of supervised release and a fine of $250,000 or more.

The charge of conspiracy to commit money laundering provides for a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a fine of $500,000 or more. The charge of conspiracy to defraud the United States provides for a maximum sentence of five years in prison, three years of supervised release and a fine of $250,000.

Huffman and the other parents were among a total of 50 people arrested last month and charged with conspiring with admitted mastermind William “Rick” Singer, 58, of Newport Beach, Calif., and others, to bribe college officials and coaches and pay test monitors to falsely inflate their children’s college entrance exam scores to secure their admission, some as purported athletes.

Several parents and other participants in the wide-ranging alleged scheme have already pleaded guilty and are cooperating with authorities.

Huffman, Loughlin and Giannulli made their first appearances in federal court in Boston last week. All of the parents were charged with one count each of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.

Huffman, 56, of Los Angeles, agreed to pay Singer at least $15,000 to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme for her oldest daughter, prosecutors said.

The other parents who are pleading guilty under plea agreements include:

Gregory Abbott, 68, of New York, N.Y., together with his wife, Marcia, 59, agreed to pay Singer $125,000 to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme for their daughter.

Jane Buckingham, 50, of Beverly Hills, Calif., agreed to pay Singer $50,000 to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme for her son.

Gordon Caplan, 52, of Greenwich, Conn., agreed to pay Singer $75,000 to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme for his daughter.

Robert Flaxman, 62, of Laguna Beach, Calif., agreed to pay Singer $75,000 to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme for his daughter.

Lori Loughlin (C) and her husband Mossimo Giannulli (L) leave the John J Moakley Federal Court House after facing charges in a nationwide college admissions cheating scheme in Boston. (Photo: Katherine Taylor, EPA-EFE)

Agustin Huneeus Jr., 53, of San Francisco, Calif., agreed to pay Singer $300,000 to participate in both the college entrance exam cheating scheme and the college recruitment scheme for his daughter.

Marjorie Klapper, 50, of Menlo Park, Calif., agreed to pay Singer $15,000 to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme for her son.

Peter Jan Sartorio, 53, of Menlo Park, Calif., agreed to pay Singer $15,000 to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme for his daughter.

Stephen Semprevivo, 53, of Los Angeles, agreed to pay Singer $400,000 to participate in the college recruitment scheme for his son.

Devin Sloane, 53, of Los Angeles, agreed to pay Singer $250,000 to participate in the college recruitment scheme for his son.

In addition, Bruce Isackson, 61, and Davina Isackson, 55, of Hillsborough, Calif., also both agreed to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud. Bruce Isackson will also plead guilty to one count of money laundering conspiracy and one count of conspiracy to defraud the IRS.

The Isacksons agreed to pay Singer an amount, ultimately totaling $600,000, to participate in the college entrance exam cheating scheme for their younger daughter and the college recruitment scheme for both of their daughters. The Isacksons also underpaid their federal income taxes by deducting the bribe payments as purported charitable contributions. The Isacksons are cooperating with the government’s investigation, prosecutors said.

Michael Center, 54, of Austin, Texas, the former head coach of men’s tennis at the University of Texas at Austin, was charged and has agreed to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud, prosecutors said.

In 2015, Center personally accepted $60,000 in cash from Singer, as well as $40,000 directed to the University of Texas tennis program, in exchange for designating the child of one of Singer’s clients as a tennis recruit, thereby facilitating his admission to the University of Texas, prosecutors said.

All of the defendants who improperly took tax deductions for the bribe payments have agreed to cooperate with the IRS to pay back taxes, prosecutors added.

Next, the federal court in Boston will schedule plea hearings for those pleading guilty, prosecutors said.

Latest

More USA TODAY High School Sports
Home
https://usatodayhss.com/2019/felicity-huffman-among-13-parents-plead-guilty-college-admissions-scandal?utm_source=smg&utm_medium=wasabi&utm_content
A list of 13 parents pleading guilty in college admissions scam, and their payments
I found this story on USA TODAY High School Sports and wanted to share it with you: %link% For more high school stories, stats and videos, visit http://usatodayhss.com.